In 1998, we formed the Sudan Relief Fund non-profit because we saw a tremendous need to provide the people of South Sudan with emergency relief and support.

South Sudan gained its independence in 2011 after years of a bloody civil war with Sudan. Despite this, conflicts have killed 400,000 people, and driven over 2 million people to flee the country as refugees1. The World Health Organization has called the crisis in South Sudan one of the worst health emergencies in the world2. Because of this grave situation, the people are in drastic need of assistance.

South Sudan’s population must deal with major humanitarian issues, including the rampant spread of diseases such as malaria (the number-one cause of death), massive poverty and homelessness, tragically high levels of famine, and extreme weather conditions that damage farms and block roads. Though in decline, the people still live in fear of raids from rebel groups.

With the help of our donors, we have provided our partners in the youngest nation in the world with critical life-saving food, clean water, shelter, clothing, medicine, and more. We have a proven track record of saving lives, getting relief to the starkest of situations.

Ultimately, our hope is to help South Sudan become a safe and self-sustaining country. We are helping to achieve this goal by building schools and hospitals, hosting training and educational programs, and developing an overall solid infrastructure to support hundreds of thousands of people. To ensure that these projects and our relief efforts are going to those most in need, our president Neil Corkery and our Director of Operations David Dettoni travel to South Sudan and visit with leaders and partners on a regular basis.

(An interactive map that shows recent and actively funded projects.)

(Video of Sudan Relief Fund partners sharing their work and gratitude for our donors)

In 2019, Sudan Relief Fund provided more than $3.3 million in aid, with $900,000 going to healthcare and medicine, $1.12 million to refugee support, and $1.35 million to education and training3.

Thanks to our partnerships with various leaders throughout Sudan, South Sudan, and Uganda, and most importantly because of the generosity of our donors, we’ve made great strides in improving the lives of the South Sudanese. Despite the ongoing challenges, we’re hopeful that we can continue to support them, and give them a chance to survive and thrive, improving the lives of millions.

Surviving Leprosy
Bringing Healing to the Forsaken

Lepers become homeless, destitute, and eventually starve. Without treatment, their disease progresses until they grow too weak or disabled to help themselves. They slowly die from exposure, starvation, illness, or attacks by wild animals.