Born Too Soon in a Country at War. Their Only Hope? This Clinic

Inside the Juba Teaching Hospital’s neonatal clinic, 1 in 10 babies brought to this clinic will die, most from treatable conditions. But mothers have nowhere else to go; it is the only public neonatal clinic in South Sudan.

The world’s youngest nation is one of the toughest places in the world for newborns with health problems to survive. A brutal civil war has drained the economy, and as hospitals closed, doctors were forced to flee.

“Our mothers here, they come for help,” said Rose Tongan, a pediatrician. “And you pity them. You can’t do anything.”

The clinic has no formula for premature babies, no lab for blood tests, and no facility for x-rays. There are no beds for breast-feeding mothers so they must sleep outside, where they are at risk of infection and vulnerable to assault.

“I feel like: What can I do?” said Dr. Tongan.

Read the rest here.

How You've Helped

Catholic University of South Sudan

Thursday, October 26, 2017

Read More

Nursing

Read More

Education

Read More

Holy Cross Catholic School

Read More

Children Raising Children

At just fourteen years old, Martha was sexually assaulted and the attack resulted in a pregnancy. Nine months later the young, unmarried girl had no means to provide for a child. Still traumatized from the aftermath of her ordeal, her body couldn’t produce milk for her newborn.